The National Maritime Historical Society

You are here > Publications > In the Pages of Sea History 157

NMHS Blog

In the Pages of Sea History 157

Sea History 157 is in the mail and on the newsstands. Just look at what’s in this issue:

Cutterman Frank Newcomb and the Rescue of USS Winslow, by William H. Thiesen
When the United States declared war on Spain in the spring of 1898, US Revenue Cutter Service Lt. Frank Newcomb, in command of USRC Hudson out of New York, was sent to patrol the north coast of Cuba. Not long after their arrival, Newcomb and his crew led a daring rescue of a disabled US Navy torpedo boat, under attack during the Battle of Cárdenas.

Lieutenant Charles Hunter, USN, and the Blanche Affair, by Evelyn M. Cherpak
In the days before wireless communications, naval captains had to use their best judgment to assess a potential enemy at sea without the benefit of verifying their planned course of action with their superiors. In the Civil War, US Navy lieutenant Charles Hunter considered it within his authority to stop ships at sea and seize them. The ramifications were deemed controversial and demonstrate the difficult gray area lesser commanders had to navigate.

Welcome to the New Land, Draken Harald Hårfagre, by Ingeborg Louise “Vesla” Adie
In 2016, the largest Viking ship built in modern times sailed to North America and toured the Great Lakes and the northeast, inspiring Norwegian-Americans to learn more about their proud Viking heritage and share it with the world.
Find this article in Featured Articles from Sea History.

The Rivers: A Celebration of Life and Work on America’s Waterways, by Daven Anderson
Each year, more than 500 million tons of freight flow past American cities and towns along our inland waterways, mostly out of the public eye. Artist Daven Anderson’s latest exhibition looks at the working craft and culture on our inland rivers, in all their grit and beauty.
Online exclusive: see more of Daven Anderson’s works here.

Funding for America’s Maritime Heritage: Rounding the Bases, by Timothy J. Runyan
While funding established by the Maritime Heritage Act of 1994 was reinstated a few years ago, the full amount promised has yet to be made available. National Maritime Alliance Chair, Dr. Timothy Runyan, has kept the pressure on Congress to restore full funding to the grants program, and he can’t do it alone. In this update, Dr. Runyan explains how we can help.
Update:

The Barque Picton Castle Bosun School: Learning the Traditional Skills of the Sailing Ship Seafarer, by Captain Daniel D. Moreland
While the Age of Sail in its true form has long passed and, with it, the everyday knowledge and skills of the mariner and rigger, there is still one place where one can go to learn the ways of a ship from a master, without committing to a long term at sea.

 

 

Plus, you’ll find the regular features you look forward to in every issue:

Deck Log
Letters
NMHS: A Cause in Motion
Marine Art News
Sea History for Kids
Ship Notes, Seaport & Museum News
Calendar
Maritime History on the Internet
Book Reviews

On our cover this issue: Morning Mist, Lower Mississippi River Mile Post 174 by Daven Anderson, Watercolor and Mixed Media on Paper, 20 x 26.5 inches.

Click here to learn more about Sea History magazine.

Comments: Comments Off on In the Pages of Sea History 157 Categories: Publications Posted By:

Comments are closed.