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Young America—New York in the 1890s  by Patrick O’Brien

Spectacular Framed 18″x 24″ Oil on Canvas
by Award Winning Marine Artist Patrick O’Brien

Offered for Sale by the National Maritime Historical Society

If you didn’t get the opportunity at our Annual Awards Dinner, now is your chance to take home the spectacular Young America – New York in the 1890s by world-renowned marine artist Patrick O’Brien, and to get an intimate glimpse into how he created the magnificent piece.  Click here or on the image above to play a short video about Patrick’s methods, extensive research and his painstaking attention to detail in producing the historic bird’s eye view of New York City’s Hudson River waterfront.  Young America – New York in the 1890s is now offered for sale by the National Maritime Historical Society for $6,000.

Young America by Patrick O'BrienThe painting presents old New York from a view over the Hudson River across from the current World Trade Center, and is based on exhaustive research into the history of New York, its waterfront, its architecture and its growth. The artist consulted numerous old maps, prints, and photos, from sources such as The NY Historical Society and The Library of Congress.  At that time, the towers of the newly completed Brooklyn Bridge were the tallest structures in New York. At the far left is St Paul’s Church (still existing, on Broadway.) To the left of the bridge tower is the Western Union Telegraph Building (demolished and replaced by a much taller building.) The spire of Trinity church, at right, was about 27 stories high, dominating the pre-elevator city, but is lost among today’s skyscrapers. And on the far right is a shot tower that was near the current day South Street Seaport.
If you would like to take home the exceptional Young America – New York in the 1890s and to support the National Maritime Historical Society at the same time, please email nmhs@seahistory.org or call (914) 737-7878, Ext. 0 today!


About Patrick O’Brien

Patrick-OBrien-portrait-photo1-265x300Patrick O’Brien’s striking paintings capture the glory and grandeur of the age of sail. His work gained widespread attention in 2010 when the U.S. Naval Academy Museum mounted an exhibition entitled The Maritime Art of Patrick O’Brien, featuring twenty-eight oil paintings by the artist. Collectors of O’Brien’s work from across the country were proud to loan their artwork for this special event.

O’Brien was a draftsman in a naval architecture firm before becoming an artist. Since 1985, he has worked as an illustrator and painter. His clients have included National Geographic, The Discovery Channel, and the Smithsonian. His art has appeared in magazines and newspapers, on posters and greeting cards, and even on billboards. In addition, Mr. O’Brien is the author and illustrator of twelve picture books for children.

In 2003 Mr. O’Brien entered the marine art field, and his first entry to the prestigious Mystic International Marine Art Exhibition won an Award of Excellence. In 2010 he won Mystic’s Museum Purchase Award, which means that the Mystic Seaport Museum in Connecticut bought the painting for its permanent collection. O’Brien’s paintings have been used four times on the cover of Naval History magazine, which is published by The U.S. Naval Institute, and in 2007 he was the subject of a four-page cover article in Sea History magazine. O’Brien has delivered lectures about his work at various maritime venues, and in 2008, a production team making a documentary for The History Channel filmed him working in his studio.

For more information on Patrick O’Brien and his other works, please visit www.PatrickOBrienStudio.com.

To take home the exceptional Young America – New York in the 1890s and to support the National Maritime Historical Society at the same time, please email nmhs@seahistory.org or call (914) 737-7878, Ext. 0 today.

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